The opposite of a body count

When you take into consideration that I have seen hundreds of comedies, the number of Hollywood movies which have made me laugh is 30. Below is a list of the movies and how many times they made me laugh.

Predator (1), The Last Boy Scout (1), Eraser (1), True Lies (1), Bad Boys (1), Yes Man (1), Total Recall (2), I Now Pronounce You Chuck & Larry (2), Bachelor Party (2), Revenge of the Nerds (3), Coming to America (3), The Naked Gun (3), Hudson Hawk (3), Scary Movie 3 (3), Lethal Weapon 3 (4), Election (4), Magic (5), Jay and Silent Bob Strike Back (5), Silver Streak (6), Rush Hour (6), Rush Hour 2 (6), Rush Hour 3 (6), Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home (7), Bill & Ted’s Excellent Adventure (7), Pulp Fiction (8), Striking Distance (9), Commando (10), National Lampoon’s Loaded Weapon 1 (11), See No Evil, Hear No Evil (12) and Revenge of the Nerds II: Nerds in Paradise (13).

As for live-action TV shows (except documentaries and reality shows), 48 of them have made me laugh (the figures are a reflection of myself watching an entire series once):

Californication (1), Breaking Bad (1), Blue Bloods (1), Blindspot (1), Limitless (1), Veep (1), Martial Law (2), One Tree Hill (2), The Wire (2), Louie (2), Chicago Fire (2), The Big Bang Theory (3), Bored to Death (3), Hannibal (3), About a Boy (3), The Flash (3), Atlanta (3), Lethal Weapon (3), Curb your Enthusiasm (4), Arrow (4), House of Lies (6), Will & Grace (7), Elementary (10), Vice Principals (13), MacGyver (14), Scrubs (15), The Mentalist (17), Nash Bridges (24), Hawaii Five-0 (27), Seinfeld (29), Friends (30), That ’70s Show (32), Two and a Half Men (41), Rules of Engagement (48), Everybody Loves Raymond (52), NCIS: Los Angeles (60), Entourage (63), The Middle (71), Silicon Valley (85), Eastbound & Down (110), Monk (183), Cheers (195), Psych (200), The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air (220), Magnum P.I. (262), NCIS (267), Frasier (278) and House (310).

The funniest episode of…

The Middle is Orlando (21).
That ’70s Show is Prank Day (23).
Frasier is Good Grief (27).
Monk is Mr. Monk Gets Hypnotized (32).
Magnum P.I. is Paper War (34).

As for Will Smith’s sitcom, this is the series breakdown…

Season 1: (50).
Season 2: (80).
Season 3: (43).
Season 4: (45).

Magnum P.I. also deserves to be singled out, because that’s the show that people talk about when they hail Moonlighting for being an early attempt at a TV series that had action, comedy, drama and romance being coalesced into a wide range of narratives. It also deserves to be singled out because it predated The A-Team yet somehow gets criticized for being a carbon copy. As someone who hails from England, I see myself as Higgins because he does Kung Fu and talks about writing memoirs.

The reality TV show that has made me laugh the most is Impractical Jokers (652). Second to that is Hotel Hell (67 times).

As for animated shows, The Simpsons = 300, South Park = 119, American Dad! = 96, Beavis and Butthead = 79, The Ricky Gervais Show = 25, Rick and Morty = 13, The Cleveland Show = 12, Family Guy = 5 and Bob’s Burgers = 4.

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Gordon Stainforth (editor) discussing the possibility of Stanley Kubrick liking The Simpsons: “I can’t imagine Stanley not really relishing it, so close is it in many ways to his own very droll sense of humour.

In the December 2013 issue of Metal Hammer, Dave Brockie (who plays Oderus Urungus in GWAR) talked about his guest appearance on The Jerry Springer Show (1997): “It was great. It was all staged. The mom wasn’t the kid’s mom. He wasn’t even a GWAR fan. I didn’t know until after the show, while we all were partying, when the mom was hitting on me then told me – Oh no, they paid me to say I was his mom; I’m an actress. All those reality shows – and I’ve done enough to know – they are not reality.”

The Meryl Streep of eighties and nineties chat shows was Wally Ann Wharton, who didn’t get much film work because it was would shatter the illusions that cynical TV producers fooled audiences with. Producers would be constantly molding her to fit the part that any given show needed for each topic. Re-runs (or YouTube uploads) of shows like Donahue and Geraldo will show you that Wally was more respected than any actress who worked in the adult industry – one of the reasons why you won’t see her act in mainstream movies and TV shows, but…hey, she found a niche while others had struggled to find their bearings.