image The last months of Bruce Lee

This was the second half of my previous article about Bruce Lee being murdered. The title is a cheeky way of referencing an unreleased Davis Miller book titled The Last Days of Bruce Lee. The original title of my article was Tracking the Dragon, as a cheekier way of mocking George Tan’s unreleased documentaries. Acting on behalf of the Lee estate, John Little stole the title for his re-release of In Pursuit of the Dragon. Little John (a Robin Hood pun) is the cheekiest of them all. There’s already a Bruce book which adopts the pun of chasing the dragon, and there’s already a Jackie Chan documentary titled Traces of a Dragon – so much for tracing instead of chasing the dragon. Alas, here is my timeline…



Monday, January 1, 1973 – Michael Allin (the writer of Enter the Dragon) goes to the Hyatt Regency hotel in H.K. so as to dine with Robert Clouse (the director) and Fred Weintraub (the main producer). Fred tells Michael that Bruce walked out in anger over the script. According to Clouse, he was so angry that he took a swing at Linda (who had better chances of being his widow than a divorcée).



Sunday, January 28 – The first week of filming is supposed to begin. According to Paul Heller (in a 2004 issue of Jade Screen), Bruce was absent for many reasons besides being nervous about starring in his first U.S. film. Paul didn’t want to elaborate (due to some personal reasons) other than describing Bruce as a great strategist.



Thursday, February 1 – Lee avoids filming on his son’s 8th birthday. Chinese people regard 8 as a lucky number. Raymond Chow insures his life under a Singaporean company called American International Assurance.



Sunday, February 4 – According to his 2011 memoir titled Bruce Lee, Woodstock and Me, Fred is getting increasingly frazzled about the no-show nature of Bruce’s show business. Linda tells him that Bruce is tied up with other business, including working on the fight choreography.



Thursday, February 8 – The first day of filming on a Chinese movie set consists of lighting incense for good luck (as illustrated in the 1977 Game of Death featurette which was featured in Bruce Lee: The Legend). This was the same day that Fred had Clouse shoot the close-ups of the praying mantis fight scene because of Bruce being A.W.O.L.



Saturday, February 17 – Lee finally shows up. According to Fred in Linda’s The Man Only I Knew (a 1975 book), Bruce walked off the set (momentarily) after he found out that Ray Chow tried to pass off Enter the Dragon as a Golden Harvest co-production instead of a Concord one. After he returns, Ahna Capri tells him that she wants to try some of the local delights (drugs). He tells her not to go around looking for these things in H.K. as you never know who will spike your goods. Ahna agrees not to. According to Fred, Lee barred Ray from being on the set two weeks later (the first day of March in my timeline will tell you why).



Sunday, February 18 – At 2 in the morning, capricious Capri gets a knock on her door, she opens it and finds a box of goodies for her. No one is there. The next day on set, she sees Bruce and he gives her a big smile. Linda begins to bring hash brownies to the set. This helps to ease the tension given that many of the extras were Triads – some of whom had challenged Bruce as well as each other. In The Incomparable Fighter, the author remembered Bruce recalling how one challenger who lost against him had been stabbed to death the next day by one or more guys who may have been fans. Bruce remarked that it’s not uncommon to be killed for the slightest antagonism.



Thursday, March 1 – He wants to sue the Sing Hoi (Star Sea) Motion Picture Company after they use his image in Fist of Unicorn, which he choreographed when it was originally going to be titled The Unicorn Palm. His death prevented the lawsuit from happening. What’s intriguing is that this company produced a 1974 movie (Chinese Godfather) starring Betty Ting-Pei opposite Michael Chan Wai-Man, who was at the Unicorn press conference (in the summer of 1972) with Lee and Fan Mei-Sheng (the latter planned Chinese Godfather). It speaks volumes about his budding friendship with Lee that Jackie Chan had been invited by him to appear in Fist of Unicorn (麒麟掌).



Friday, March 2 – Ray confirms to the media that G.H. is trying to bring together Bruce and former co-star Siu Fong-Fong (蕭芳芳) a.k.a. Josephine Siao. She is primarily known to Westerners as playing Jet Li’s feisty mother in the Fong Sai Yuk duology, whose first movie was released to avid fanfare and critical adulation in March of 1993. Twenty years earlier, she was returning to the limelight after studying at Seton Hall University in New Jersey (she got an honours degree in Communications). According to Ray, preliminary talks between both sides has so far turned out favourable.



Sunday, April 1 – When filming a new opening scene (a cold open or a prologue instead of a replacement) of Enter the Dragon, Sammo Hung notices that Lee’s pupils are dilated. According to Clouse’s book about Enter the Dragon, Lee tried to dissuade an old friend from using drugs. He spent some time trying to send the man to a rehabilitation center but failed. He got a doctor to visit his friend and continued paying for medicine until he found out that the guy was selling the vitamins to raise cash for more drugs. The addict’s dealer must have known. The irony isn’t that Lee was a drug addict but that he didn’t get the munchies after taking reefer. Sam asked Bruce why he lost weight, to which the latter responded that he wanted to be faster.



Sunday, April 22 – Bruce sends a letter to Ted Ashley (the chairman of the Warner Brothers studio who was born in 1922). Bruce beats around the bush by hinting that he had a bad experience making a film with a person and organization in H.K. to the extent of describing himself as being burned during that one time. Even though he would later agree to reserve a few months for an S.B. project, Fred Weintraub noted (in Bruce Lee: The Man Only I Knew) that the Chinese have a habit of saying yes to everything without always meaning it. According to Linda, Bruce expressed a desire to return to America in August with the intention of only going to H.K. twice per year (or so) to make movies (sort of like what Jackie used to do during his Hollywood heyday).



Monday, April 30 – The end of the month is the end of Bruce’s tether despite James Coburn visiting him earlier to discuss rekindling The Silent Flute. In spite of Ray’s media manipulation which suggests otherwise, they were not on happy terms. Reading Everett L. Shostrom’s Man, the Manipulator, two years prior, made Bruce appear to be ill-advised by comparison. Linda could be accused of being manipulative, since she didn’t like living in H.K. and missed her loved ones. She places insurance on Bruce’s life through a company called Lloyds of London for over a million U.S. dollars. What incriminates her more is that he listed his total earnings on his federal income tax as a mere $17,000.



Saturday, May 5 – The insurance policies had come into place. This is creepily reminiscent of The Chinese Stuntman (a 1981 drama starring Bruce Li a.k.a. James Ho). It was planned because he didn’t dance to the tune of the Triads. The Chinese Stuntman is a Bruceploitation movie without people knowing it (it’s not merely a case of “in name only” in terms of the lead’s stage name). In 1971, he had to be restrained from wailing on rival hustlers when Lo Wei paid to film the park scene in Fist of Fury (精武門). Linda was all too aware that his refusal could hamper the welfare of their two kids. The Big Boss (唐山大兄) was filmed in Thailand for a reason.



Thursday, May 10 – He nearly dies during a break in the dubbing session of Enter the Dragon at the G.H. studio. He collapses in the men’s room and pretends that he is looking for his glasses. A studio assistant helps him walk to the dubbing room, but Lee collapses and convulses. Ray calls Baptist Hospital with the intent of asking to talk with his own physician instead of phoning the paramedics. When Lee wakes up, his eyes are spinning. The doctors presume that he is poisoned because of a combination of kidney failure and brain swelling. The drug that saved his life was Mannitol because it tends to be used to flush out a lethal excess of sodium. Near the end of his life, he was existing on a diet of juice and soya bean milk. Therefore, his drug stash was tainted.



Friday, May 25 – Bruce goes to L.A. for the check-up and is told by a physician that he’s got a body that is akin to that of an 18-year-old. A neurologist gives him medication for the management of epilepsy. Van Williams (the star of The Green Hornet) was told by Bruce that the reason for the migraines was that he had pinched a nerve in his neck.



Thursday, May 31 – Lee meets the Japanese author of The Incomparable Fighter for the final time. The man whose name is often abbreviated to M. Uyehara had observed that Lee was emaciated. His waist only measured 26 inches. Lee tried to get out of it by saying that the camera adds 10 pounds, so his 120 lbs frame would be 130 lbs in front of a lens. In actual fact, Bruce told Peter Lee (eldest brother) that he did not know why his weight loss was happening. Bruce’s lower back pain was so immense that his constant cortisone injections caused muscle atrophy. Lee proved to M. that he was more powerful than ever when getting him to hold a cushion so that Lee could deliver a punch that was 6 inches away. The cushion landed at the far corner of the room.



Friday, June 8 – Bruce attends the last of his physicals. Bruce meets Bob Wall for the last time because the former will be returning to H.K. on the next day. Like Maria Yi (衣依) and Nora Miao (苗可秀) before him, Bob notices that Bruce repeats himself like he’s telling an anecdote for the first time. In his 1989 biography about Bruce, Clouse claimed that June was when Bruce finished dubbing some dialogue in Burbank that had been poorly recorded in H.K.



Thursday, June 28 – Despite Lee assuring Ray that he is still a G.H. affiliate by making daily visits to the set of Taekwondo Heroes (which Ray spearheaded at Lee’s suggestion of making a star out of Jhoon Rhee), Ray is aghast when reading an issue of The China Mail which states that Lee has scooped a superstar salary. This was for the role of Lieutenant Hip in The Man with the Golden Gun (the role was demoted significantly after Lee passed away). What prompted the news scoop is the previous day’s Variety review of The Big Boss, where the reviewer noted the “sheer mindlessness” of it.



Whether Lee learned about the review via his youngest brother phoning or faxing (since Robert was studying in the U.S.) remains to be seen. Ray could imagine the headline had Bruce went from being in talks to actually signing: From Golden Harvest to Golden Gun. Bruce had already scared him with the S.B. photoshoot in the second week of June. The old devil should’ve gleaned the last detail that Bruce imparted:


“It gives me security in the years ahead and makes taxation much easier. Besides, it doesn’t bar me from working with any other studio.”



Tuesday, July 10 – Lo Wei (who also directed The Big Boss) claims that Bruce threatened him with a knife in a G.H. screening room. Bruce counteracts that he wouldn’t need to kill Lo with a weapon. His ownership of it indicates a wary awareness that his physical condition was too weakened to intimidate. The cops never found it because Linda had hid it. This day also marks the final televised interview that Bruce gave. In the last and lost TVB interview with Ivan Ho, he indirectly chastises Lo. Wei had ties to the mob as Jackie attested in his 1998 book, which spilled the beans on Lo being a top member of the Sun Yee On Triad (which was headed by the dad of Charles Heung). They rule a New Territories town, Tuen Mun, where Bruce filmed the first scenes of Enter the Dragon. Ouch!



Thursday, July 12 – Lee demands Ray to invite Wong Nguk-Chung, who was the editor of Galaxy Pictorial Magazine (a G.H. publication). Lee is livid about an article written by Wong. Ray tries to assure Lee that he bore no ill will. When Wong arrives, Lee tells (or rather yells at) him to sit down. Lee draws out his small knife from his belt and places it on Wong’s neck. Lee rebukes him by making a metaphor about his knife being similar to a pen before rebuking him for claiming that Ray groomed him. His anger gradually subsides after Ray helps Wong to put in a good word. After the misunderstanding is cleared, Lee shakes hands with a visibly shaken Wong. In theory, Lee should’ve been murdered on Friday the 13th.



Saturday, July 14 – Jackie claimed that the bowling anecdote took place 6 days before Bruce died. What’s fascinating to note is that Bruce didn’t bowl despite wanting to go with Jackie. From the latter’s point-of-view, Bruce was brooding in a way that suggested he was plotting his next move (as typed in a book titled Dying for Action: The Life and Films of Jackie Chan). Meanwhile, many of the bowlers were bowled over by the fact that he was there. In an interview with Jackie, John Little learned that Jackie liked to go to the bowling alleys because the Triads never frequented there. He stopped going to the pool halls because that’s where the Triads would congregate.



Monday, July 16 – Lee phones Unicorn Chan (小麒麟) because he couldn’t be contacted in person due to working in Manila on a film titled The Unwanted. Unicorn is told that Lee is getting headaches. After Lee’s death, Unicorn denied this because he could not be seen by Star Sea to be in cahoots with Lee (who he has known since childhood) following the previous announcement of the impending lawsuit. The flip side to the denial is that Unicorn can’t be interrogated about a topic which he ostensibly has no awareness of.



Tuesday, July 17 – Wong sees Lee at the G.H. studio, he decides to walk away but Lee sees him and engages him in conversation. After a while of chatting, Lee tells him that some people in H.K. are not friendly with him. Wong doesn’t understand who he is referring to. Afterwards, Lee declares that he will return to Seattle. He confided to the wrong man. This was the same day that Lee was supposed to have got Ray to sign George Lazenby to G.H. If true, Lee intended Lazenby to be his successor so that Ray wouldn’t be so clingy. If false, Ray was the one who anointed Lazenby for the press to anoint as Golden Harvest’s golden boy. I find it to be dubious that there has never been photos of the two stars to highlight such a momentous occasion. For those who care to differ…


:picsorSTFU:



Thursday, July 19 – There is a vitriolic argument at night. Bruce and Ray argue over the accounts of Concord. Tom Bleecker claimed that the box office receipt of The Way of the Dragon (猛龍過江) was falsely inflated (foreboding how Ip Man 3 was reported for having a fraudulent earning). This was to hide the flagrant fact that protection money was being laundered to the Triads. According to his interview on the U.S. Death by Misadventure DVD, Charles Lowe (a.k.a. Luk Ching) claimed that this was the day when he last saw Bruce. It was Charles (not Ray) who Bruce was going to have dinner with on the next day. At this juncture, I should note that he ended up being one of the cameramen for Bruce Lee, the Man and the Legend.



He claimed that Lee was going to have a brain tumour removed in the U.S. circa October after completing Game of Death. Lee knew that cannabis lessens such tumours. He only confided in Lowe about his tumour and wanted him to accompany himself to the U.S. Jhoon Rhee mentioned that Lee told him in an overseas phone call (on the day before he met his maker) that he quarrelled with Huang Feng (a director) because Lee wanted Rhee to get top billing for what was now going to be known in English as When Taekwondo Strikes (跆拳震九州). It should be noted that, when it got released in September, Angela Mao got top billing. Rhee (Cantonese name: Li Chun-Kau) thinks that Lee treated Ray like a servant.



Friday, July 20 – It’s interesting that he died on this date given that 20th Century Fox wanted him to return to the passion project that was The Silent Flute. This was also the same day when Fist of Fury was released in the U.K. Ray knew damn well that Bruce was on the verge of death, but dragged out the time so that the ambulance wouldn’t reach him in time. It’s too convenient of Ray to use George as an alibi. The excuse was that the trio were to discuss Game of Death at the Gum Tin Jung restaurant within the Miramar hotel (George claims that the Japanese made Bruce’s favourite food). This was a droll way for Ray to exonerate himself from being involved in the matter.



Andre Morgan (G.H. producer) claimed that the trio had a morning meeting at his office. Lee ate hash (almost a semi-literal smoking gun), complained of a headache and asked Andre for codeine but he didn’t have any. Lazenby claimed to have lunched with Lee after the meeting. According to Matthew Polly’s Chasing the Dragon article for Playboy, Lee and Ray went straight to Betty’s home instead of Lee’s house. Maybe Lee would still have been alive if he focused on casting Irene Ryder instead. I would like to digress by referencing a recent news story of a Brit, Daniella Obeng, who also died at the age of 32. The singer had been living with a brain tumour and epilepsy for years, which meant that she had suffered “silent seizures.”



There has been hearsay about whether Bruce really did write to his attorney, Adrian Marshall, on the day of his death. After all, his service was dismissed in the previous year for a reason which hasn’t been satisfactory. Considering that Adrian went on to have a decade-spanning relationship with Linda after the death, it’s patently clear that the letter was a fabrication so as to make sure that she could control Bruce’s estate. It becomes clearer when reading the following sentence from the letter:


“I would like to meet with you first before meeting with Raymond Chow and then both of us will hear him out.”



13:00 – In what I call the thirteenth hour, Linda claims to have said goodbye to Bruce so that she could have lunch with Rebu Hui – the wife of a singer named Samuel (許冠傑). She didn’t say that it happened at 1 p.m. on the dot; it was just sometime in that hour. As an aside, I should point out that “thirteenth stroke of the clock” is a phrase to indicate that the previous events must be called into question.



14:00 – Ray supposedly visited Bruce’s home, Crane’s Nest, to plan the pagoda picture. Both were alone. It’s eerie that everyone was gone on the day that he died, because the Lee residence usually had the hustle and bustle that you would expect if two families lived under the same roof of a house that wasn’t semi-detached (it was more busy than a Chinese restaurant). To this very day, Linda can’t recount the whereabouts of Wu Ngan (胡奀) and his family. A probable scenario is that Ray hinted about the Triads not being pleased by the way which Bruce brushed them off. He also most likely hinted that it was a bad idea for him to leave H.K. for good.



Bruce went ballistic and told Ray that the Triads had no sway over him. Ray went back to the Triads and informed them that Bruce wouldn’t play ball. Needless to say, the Triads wanted his head to be dead as a form of enough was enough. The Triads and Ray knew that they would be screwed financially if Bruce stayed in Hollywood – more box office competition. Despite being a top fighter, he wasn’t expecting to encounter a group of mobsters equipped with an assortment of blades. While some thugs may have encountered an untimely end, Bruce gets mortally wounded.



15:00 – According to the doorman, Bruce and Ray arrived at Beverly Heights. At the inquest, Ray was asked about this to which he heatedly denied it by explaining that it wasn’t possible because they were studying a new draft. It’s more likely that Betty was being used to talk sense to Bruce.



16:00 – Linda claimed to miss Bruce by a hair’s breadth because Ray drove him to Betty so that they could discuss Game of Death. The doorman claimed that Ray left Beverly Heights at this time. What happened there from 16:00 to 22:00 is anyone’s guess. Bruce was more likely fatally stabbed. His bare torso was never photographed by the medical examiner or even the coroner. It was enough time to get rid of him and clean up any blood residue (this was before ultraviolet lights were invented to detect blood splatter). A female employee, Ma Cheh, reported that she heard Bruce shouting crazily and banging on the door in the evening.



18:30 – Lee didn’t turn up at the restaurant, so Charles Lowe phones his home. Someone at the receiving end says that he isn’t there and something happened. Lowe goes to the house. He sees four of Lee’s stuntmen and his son – Brandon. The latter claims (in broken Cantonese) that his dad was working on a movie. One stuntman says that he doesn’t think Lee will be coming back. The men look sad. Lowe asks which hospital is he based at. The men are really secretive, so he can’t get any more info from them. He leaves and goes home. This reminds me of the scene in Game of Death II (a.k.a. Tower of Death) when the pseudo-Bruce actor is stopped by four corpse guards. Anyway, the official time of death was 20:00.



19:30 – The official story of his decay starts at this moment. Bruce complains of a headache, so he takes an aspirin. Lazenby claimed that Bruce called him at the restaurant to complain about the headache. Lazenby told him that they could cancel dinner, but Bruce insisted that he wouldn’t bail out. You would think that Bruce would be self-medicating while waiting for a taxi. If the ex-Bond is telling the truth, this would mean that Bruce called after telling Betty about it. If he’s lying, this means that Ray happened upon the discovery that citing extortion would make Lazenby’s hastily-arranged contract go from bribery to blackmail.



21:00 – Betty was either awakened by Bruce convulsing or she awoke on her own to discover he had lapsed into what she believed was a coma. Ray called her to find out why Bruce and herself weren’t at the meeting in the Japan-themed restaurant. Ray and Betty have a fair chance of saving his life. He undergoes the same medical problem in May. Either one can call an ambulance and have him transported to Baptist where doctors familiar with his previous collapse will administer Mannitol, thus relieving him of the cerebral-spinal fluid pressure in his brain. Neither one promptly reports. I find it to be suspect that Linda never filed charges for gross negligence.



21:20 – Ray has spent 20 minutes driving over to Beverly Heights through a typhoon.



21:30 – Ray has slapped Bruce around and shaken him violently for 10 minutes! I’m sure that someone with a bleak streak of humour will say that it symbolizes how Ray’s misconduct was a slap in the face. Failing to awaken him, he calls Betty’s personal physician. The line is busy, but Ray keeps trying and finally gets through. It’s too bad that Bruce didn’t have his entourage with him.



21:50 – Dr. Eugene Chu has driven over to Betty’s place.



22:00 – He has slapped Bruce around for 10 minutes and, at some point, begins to have difficulty finding a pulse! Eugene decides to have Bruce transported to a hospital. Baptist is just a few short blocks away. Does Eugene order Bruce rushed to Baptist? No. He has the ambulance driver transport him clear across the city to Queen Elizabeth Hospital (who weren’t familiar with his medical history). Ray calls Linda to tell her to arrive at the latter hospital. Incidentally, it is nearest to Bruce’s home. She recalled (in I Am Bruce Lee) that she was at the hospital way before he arrived. The receptionist didn’t even know about him being sent to the hospital.



22:15 – The ambulance arrives. Over the years, people speculated that the reason why it took so long for Bruce to be taken to the hospital is because he was naked. In recent years, Betty confirmed that they did have an affair. It doesn’t help matters that Betty teaching BDSM has been conjectured as to why he had experienced submucosal hemorrhages in the rectum. To be fair, he did say that he was receiving a revelation of cleverness from her during the time frame of The Way of the Dragon. Still, I can’t imagine him subjecting himself to autoerotic asphyxiation like David Carradine (who filled in for Bruce when The Silent Flute was adapted as Circle of Iron).



23:00 – Ray announces to the press that Bruce is dead. Traces of cannabis were still in his stomach and small intestine. This means that not much time had gone by from when he consumed it to when he died. When duly noting the similarities of ganja ingestion and cerebral edema to the May 10 collapse, Bey Logan had paraphrased Arthur Conan Doyle’s catchphrase (for a 2002 interview on The Divine Wind):


“When you have eliminated all which is impossible, then whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth.



Ngan (who appeared in The Way of the Dragon and Enter the Dragon) alongside Bob Baker (who was the Russian mobster in Fist of Fury) absconded as they were paid, on Linda’s behalf, to leave H.K. They were paid by Andre Morgan, who (even now) refuses to converse about this most dirty of deals. According to Linda, Bob was Bruce’s drug courier and bodyguard. He also smuggled guns for Bruce’s safety (even Jim Kelly claimed that Bruce was packing heat). To offer a brief respite from this heavy article, I would like to point out the Yin-Yang symbolism of the socks and shoes seen below.



Bob was paid 10,000 H.K. dollars; whereas Ngan was paid 55,000 U.S. dollars. If they were just paid for their pre-mortem services then it would’ve been severance payment. They didn’t even stay to help Linda move back to Seattle (this implies an avoidance of DNA analysis and questioning). Ngan’s involvement in the poisoning plot reminds me of what Eliza Dushku (as Veronica Dawson) said in the series finale of Banshee:


“The butler did it?!”



Bruce philosophized that you should either learn to endure or hire a bodyguard. It’s strange for a bodyguard to be paid less than a butler whose figure isn’t a tidy sum like 50 or 60 grand. Sure, Ngan had mouths to feed but not that many. You must remember that he was managing just fine living in England before Bruce invited him to have both families live with each other in 1971. After these shifty out-of-bank transactions, Linda begged Ray to give her some money. This suggests that they were allies instead of sworn enemies. There is a Chinese proverb that philosophizes:


“The enemy of my enemy is my friend.”



Patrick Wang Sai-Yuk, photographer, was disallowed to snap anything in the morgue other than Bruce’s head for the Kam Yeh Pao newspaper. David Chiang (姜大衛) spent all day trying to find Bruce because the latter agreed that he would let his house be used for his directorial début (A Mad World of Fools).



23:30 – A pressman phoned Nora to inform her of the news regarding Bruce’s passing. She called Bruce’s home number but the person who picked up the phone was Ray. She asked him whether it was true. He confirmed it.



Saturday, July 21 – After midnight, Ray calls Donald Langford – Bruce’s own physician who saved him on May 10. Bruce having Don’s card on him indicates that his service wasn’t dismissed after all. Don and his wife lived in the same suburb as Bruce. When Ray called, he informed Don that he was leaving the hospital with Linda. He then asked if they could stop by Don’s house.



1:00 – Ray and Linda arrive at the house. She didn’t know what to tell the press. In the living room, she asked Don if he knew about any of Bruce’s relationships with other women. He told her that he didn’t know of any. This is beginning to feel like an episode of Ray Donovan.



Thursday, July 26 – The day after the H.K. funeral. Linda dubiously informs the press that she holds no people or person to be responsible, despite the awaiting verdict being anyone’s guess. Why else should she deny that a wrongdoing had occurred? She seems petrified during the Kai Tak airport interview. If he was put down against her wishes then she would’ve confessed once she was safe and sound in Seattle. A coffin photo shows that he has a scar on his left cheek. En route to Seattle, the coffin had to be replaced because of a leak from the make-up that obscured his injuries.



Other reports in the press were translated for a 1994 documentary titled The Curse of the Dragon. China Post: Police Hunt for Lee Drug Source (警方追捕李某毒源). Hong Kong Star: Bruce Lee Murdered (李小龍被謀殺). In a 1993 interview for Inside Kung Fu, Rob Lee admitted that his family believe that Bruce was bumped off. Peter Lee observed that he had a small bruise on his neck. Other notations include moderate bruises on his fingertips of both hands and a groin scar. Stirling Silliphant declared that it was Bruce’s martial artistry that failed him instead of protecting him.



Monday, July 30 – U.S. funeral parlour workers stated that his hands and feet were blackened. This is a common side effect of arsenic poisoning (which doesn’t cause cerebral edema) and snake venom powder poisoning (think about the devenomized snake in Enter the Dragon). James Coburn attends Bruce’s Seattle funeral and observes that his face looks like a mask because of the make-up.



In keeping with the meaning of the title, the timeline ends here before my next article.

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